Category Archives: Quickness

Emblem

A cab ride is something that most people have experienced in their life, and if not have an idea of the concept. Like the online gaming does for Sandy Baldwin, a cab driver is a media that can get you, or someone’s thoughts, from one point to where they are trying to be. A cab ride is an emblem that represents the same element of quickness that the E-Lit work “The World Order: Basra” displays. The online gaming is a media that Baldwin uses to convey the thought of disfiguring of the language of a poem. A cab driver is that media relative to traveling from point A to point B. It is the quickest way to get from where you are to where you want to be, like Baldwin trying to get to a place where the viewer can understand her thought process about disfiguring the language of a poem.

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Analogy

When thinking about Sandy Baldwin’s “The World Order: Basra“, I related the E-Lit work to telling a story to a child. When parents, guardians, or even just elders look to explain an important lesson to children them usually use a short story. This is because, like Calvino’s horse emblem, a story about an everyday event is relatable to children. If one were to try to explain the important lesson in conversation, the children would most liking become confused and miss the point. The E-Lit work is trying to convey a deep thought, but must use a common media to explain it as quickly as possibly. This is like telling a child a story. The story, like the destroying of the words in the poem, convey quickness.

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Graphic Design

When evaluating the E-Lit work “New World Order: Basra“, by Sandy Baldwin, I noticed that the graphic element that gives the work the sense of the quality of quickness was Rhythm and Balance, elements discussed as a chapter in “Graphic Design The New Basics” by Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Phillips. The work uses online gaming as its media. The quickness of the game is found in the interpretation of it, but the balance of words of the poem in the room, where the game is set, is what gives the viewer the sense of quickness. One is able to quickly destroy the words as intended because they are well placed and balanced. The words are equal sizes so the viewer is able to quickly destroy them and yet still appreciate that each word is equally as important as the next.

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E-Lit

Sandy Baldwin’s “New Word Order: Basra” is an E-Lit work that conveys quickness very well. The work consists of a virtual game where the viewer is a person (known as Basra) holding a weapon. The viewer uses the weapon to destroy and disfigure words of a Billy Collins poem. The short abstract one reads before the work describes how the author was looking to convey a sense of disfiguring of the language of the poem. This E-Lit work does this the quickest and most literal way, by allowing the viewer to destroy the work with weapons. The E-lit work uses quickness as a core value. The author was looking for the quickest way to convey the message and did so very well. Similar to Calvino, Baldwin also selected a media that is popular and relatable, like the horse Calvino used. Baldwin used online gaming to express her thoughts. Online gaming is largest demographic of new media usage.

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Calvino’s Quickness

“The secret of the story lies in its economy; the events, however long they last, become punctiform, connected by rectilinear segments, in a zigzag pattern that suggests incessant motion.” – Italo Calvino

The quote mentioned above is from Calvino’s “Six Memos for the New Millennium”. Calvino saw this element of literature as quickness. As seen in the quote, he mentions that no matter how long the event in the story carries over a time line, the story should be quick or display constant motion. When reading a story, one is not looking to hear about the unimportant aspects. The reader is looking for what is intriguing and captivating. This is the benefit of story telling, it gives someone the opportunity of reminiscing on an event without having to actually be there.Calvino gives an example of a quick story when he mentions the story of Charlemagne, as told by Jules Barbey d’Aurevilly in a book of unpublished notes. He discusses the value of the story is in its ability to express a large and important portion of Charlemagne’s life in a short and condensed story.

Calvino uses another story where the plot better describes quickness literally, Thomas De Quincey’s “The English Mail-Coach”. In a section of the book called “The Vision of Sudden Death”, Quincey describes a man driving a mail-coach who falls asleep. He is driving 19 mph (which is fast for 1849) on the wrong side of the road towards an oncoming couple. Calvino discusses the story in respect to the feeling one would get in the situation of the driver. That feeling of rush is the feeling one looks for when reading a story. The story needs to convey quickness.

Calvino uses a very relatable emblem for this element. He describes quickness as a horse. Aside from a horse being one of the quickest things they had at one point in time, almost everyone could relate to either riding a horse or at least seeing one run. Calvino was not the first to use horse as an emblem. This emblem is trace all the way back to Galileo.

When thinking about Calvino’s quickness, the of the most famous story tellers, Jesus Christ, comes to mind. Jesus was known for his parables. These stories are considered by most to be some of the most important lessons to ever be heard, and yet most of them consist of a short story about and everyday event. Jesus uses simple and uncomplicated short stories to convey a deep lesson. Calvino would look to this as displaying elements of quickness.

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